Ethno’Linguistic Minorities

Cambodia’s diverse Khmer Leu (Upper Khmer) or chunchiet (mmofrtiet), who live in the country’s mountainous regions, probably number between 60,000 and 70,000.
 
The majority of these groups live in the northeast of Cambodia, in the provinces of Ratanakiri, Mondulkm, Stung Treng and Kratie. The hugest group is the Tompuon (many other spellings are used), who number around 15,000. Other groups include the Pnong, Kreung, Kavet, Brau and Jarai.
 
The hill tribes of Cambodia have long been isolated from mainstream Khmer society, and there is little in the way of mutual understanding. They practise shifting cultivation, rarely staying in one place for long. Finding a new location for a village requires a village elder to mediate with the spirit world. Very few of the minorities wear the sort of colourful traditional costumes found in Thailand, Laos and Vietnam.
 
If you want to discover more about Vietnam beautiful country, come to visit Vietnam through a 1 day Halong bay tour.

The annual CEI Dinner has the reputation as the most prominent gala dinner of the year in the liberty scene

The annual CEI Dinner has the reputation as the most prominent gala dinner of the year in the liberty scene. This year they took it up a notch in production value, with an elaborate Alice In Wonderland theme, complete with flowered walls, oversized chairs, and other cool elements. The colors were actually cool for the after party, so I shot in color this time, and tried to capture the psychedelic vibe with some dynamic swirly light shots. Another fun memorable night with a great crowd. Another winner from the Competitive Enterprise Institute
PLEASE HELP! I don’t know everyone. I want everyone to see their pictures. TAG YOUR FRIENDS within the picture. If you know ‘em, tag ‘em!
I hope you enjoy this album :)
Feel free to use my photos of you for anything you like.
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In 2012, the punk band Pussy Riot was jailed by Vladimir Putin’s regime for protesting against Putin

In 2012, the punk band Pussy Riot was jailed by Vladimir Putin’s regime for protesting against Putin. They spent 21 months in prison. Now, in a new podcast interview, the founder of Pussy Riot gives her perspective on how Putin uses repression and misinformation to control the population in his country. She also asserts that Putin is wildly misrepresented in the American media — and she says American politicians and liberal activists obsess over Putin in order to distract from America’s internal problems. The interview also features actor John Cusack talking about his new book about his trip to visit whistleblower Edward Snowden in Russia. If you like this kind of journalism, consider becoming a subscriber at http://www.patreon.com/sirota

NEW PODCAST: Listen to me ask Republican Congressman Ken Buck how he can slam Congress for being corrupt, while he consistently votes to help his…

NEW PODCAST: Listen to me ask Republican Congressman Ken Buck how he can slam Congress for being corrupt, while he consistently votes to help his major donors. During our interview, Buck also asserts that corporate billionaires appointed to Cabinet positions are helping fight corruption and drain the swamp. If you like this kind of journalism, consider becoming a $5 or $10 subscriber at http://www.patreon.com/sirota

New documents show that Republican governors raked in huge cash from utilities and oil/gas companies as GOP state lawmakers moved to block fracking…

New documents show that Republican governors raked in huge cash from utilities and oil/gas companies as GOP state lawmakers moved to block fracking regs and reduce support for solar power. The documents also show that the Republican governors got big donations from pharmaceutical companies as they faced bills to reduce drug prices. Click to read International Business Times’ new report.

The term “resistance” is one we hear a lot in the Trump Era — but can a resistance to Trump be successful and bring about real change if it is not…

The term “resistance” is one we hear a lot in the Trump Era — but can a resistance to Trump be successful and bring about real change if it is not based around a coherent policy agenda? On this special subscriber-only podcast, you’ll hear me explore that topic in an interview I did with an independent news outlet called The Real News. You’ll hear me discuss how the current Democratic Party resistance to Trump seems based more around a singular opposition to Trump himself, rather than around a cohesive set of policy ideas — and what that could mean for the next few years. If you like this kind of reporting, consider becoming a $5 or $10 subscriber at http://www.patreon.com/sirota

This is not a Hammond (2017) http://lfus

This is not a Hammond (2017) http://lfus.org/album.cfm?This%20is%20not%20a%20Hammond
This is not a Hammond. This is not even a pipe. It is my final album. It is time to say goodbye to the label Flux Records, which I established in 1994 in New York, and to the 746 works and 169 records I made over the past 36 years.
Veni, Vidi, Perdidi.

Dear Dad

Dear Dad. I love you so much. It’s not easy to say goodbye to such a wonderful and loving man and spirit. You died in my arms so recently, yet your passing is a further testament to the belief that life continues after death. I still feel your presence in all my actions and thoughts. When I listen to beautiful music and when I feel lost or elated you are there, not just in memory but in the soul of the present. Thank you for so many memories to cherish and so many adventures ahead that I know you will be a part of. Thank you for the many chapters we shared. I have been so fortunate to be your son, your friend, and in the end a mother and caretaker to you.
Please don’t feel sorry for me or my family in my father’s passing and don’t feel sorry for Evzen in his battle against cancer. The last ten days we spent with him were some of the funniest, warmest and most intimate times we ever shared. I have never felt so connected to him. I feel truly blessed to be able to tell him and sing to him all I felt in those final days we shared.
Many of you knew him or knew of him. A larger than life, bear of a man. An incredible chef, a doting father, a loving husband, a creative spirit, a dedicated film producer, an eternal optimist, a great athlete, a kind man, a patriarch, and of course a party animal.
Thank you Dad for the ups, the downs, the travels, the laughs, the arguments, the food, the tears, the love, the inspiration and the life.
In his last moments I sat with him in his bed with my hand on his heart, we could sense it was near the end. His breath began to escape and the “death rattle” slithered through him. My mother grabbed his hand and tears welled in her eyes. I’ve never heard a truer quote in my life when she exclaimed “Darling, I love you so so much”. With his last drop of energy he looked to her, raised his lips to a warm smile, and slipped into the afterlife. He left us with the serene expression of a wise king.
We often think of death as tragedy, as sadness and loss; Black veils and mourning. I think of my father’s death as a celebration to the colorful life he lead and the extraordinary world he has now entered.

Come gather ’round people, Wherever you roam, And admit that the waters, Around you have grown, And accept it that soon, You’ll be drenched to the…

Come gather ’round people
Wherever you roam
And admit that the waters
Around you have grown
And accept it that soon
You’ll be drenched to the bone.
If your time to you
Is worth savin’
Then you better start swimmin’
Or you’ll sink like a stone
For the times they are a-changin’.
Come senators, congressmen
Please heed the call
Don’t stand in the doorway
Don’t block up the hall
For he that gets hurt
Will be he who has stalled
There’s a battle outside
And it is ragin’.
It’ll soon shake your windows
And rattle your walls
For the times they are a-changin’.
Come mothers and fathers
Throughout the land
And don’t criticize
What you can’t understand
Your sons and your daughters
Are beyond your command
Your old road is
Rapidly agin’.
Please get out of the new one
If you can’t lend your hand
For the times they are a-changin’.
- Bob Dylan

A Vietnamese enfant in Paris

The relations between the French and the Vietnamese can be ascribed to Buddhist karma.
 
During the 80 years of French colonisation, how much blood, how many tears were shed by the Vietnamese people! Nine years of war of liberation cost both sides plenty: more than 20,000 men of the French Expeditionary Corps, fell on the battlefield of Indochina, and half a million Vietnamese in (he armed forces and the civilian population perished.
 
You would expect that after so much pain and heartache, a definitive break would be unavoidable. But the wheel of history continues to turn, colonjaliwn passes, the two peoples remain and have drawn together. A quarter-century after Dien Bien Phu, French-Vietnamese acculturation continues with French cultural elements flowing in the veins of Vietnamese like elements of the Chinese culture that have done so for 2,000 years now.
 
Viet Nam is part of the Francophone community. A new phenomenon has appeared in the years since doi moi (renovation): the ties between the two peoples have extended to all domains, including blood relations. French couples have so far adopted 7,000 Vietnamese children, comprising the most significant foreign adoption population in France. Why this preference?
 
Is it because of the special character of relations between the French and Vietnamese, arising from the imbroglio of colonisation and war? Or because of the mythical prestige of Viet Nam after these two wars, and the exoticism of its tropical landscapes? Or because young Vietnamese migrants are known for their attachment to family, their application to learning and theừ brisk intelligence?
 
In any case, as far as I know, no French adopting parent has complained of his or her Vietnamese adoptive child. Instead, most have said they are happy with their adoptions, as testified by many articles in Passions Viet Nam, a review originally published quarterly by the French adopting parents.
 
Take the case of the Ravel couple who wrote in the eighth issue 2001:
 
"The first look, that meeting of eyes with one’s child, is an impalpable unreal, instant and magical moment. In a fraction of a second, one becomes a parent, and responsible. We will have three times to feel the same emotion, the same violent shock. This shock is reciprocal and we have kept engraved in our memory the insisting but confident look of Heloise-Marie. She Was just eight days old. Those meetings are unbelievable and hard to describe. In the second meeting, an indestructible bond is established for life, for our lives. We have traveled to the end of the world to receive the most extraor-dinary gift that we could hope for: life.
 
“Adoption can appear as a mystery but we are firmly here in reality. In an instant all our travels became a single chain: from the day when we gave up a biological birth; the decision to adopt a baby; hope; deception’ hope again; the procedure; expectation; the big jump into the unknown; the arrival in Sai Gon; awaiting; the interminable cyclo rides; and finally, one day, on December 14 1994, a phone call from Sister Marie-Cecile: “A little girt is waiting you at the Phu Son-Tu Du maternity home” – a birth. From mourning to birth, immersion in adoption is also a baptism.
 
“Our feelings evolve rapidly. From the love for our adoptive child to the sympathy with her country of origin, there is only one step. The adopting parents seek to understand the terra incognita which is Viet Nam, with its lights and shadows, and look for its assistance.
 
“After receiving so much, we created in 1999 at the end of our third trip the Association of Children of Viet Nam (to arrange adoptions, to build more schools in the country).
 
“… How to explain this development so rapid, and what are our profound motivations? In the end, it’s too hard to say. A new adventure has begun: a love story with Việt Nam. To devote little or much of our time win be nothing compared to the happiness that Viet Nam has given us and is giving us everyday.”
 
Learn more about Buddhism with Thailand and Laos trip